Fourteen Rays
Sunset at the tip of Longboat Key, Florida. Taken with a really small aperture to cause the sun rays (1/8 second, f/29, ISO 100)
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Fourteen Rays

Sunset at the tip of Longboat Key, Florida. Taken with a really small aperture to cause the sun rays (1/8 second, f/29, ISO 100)

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

A Stream of Thoughts
Endlessly flowing as the wind blows. Taken in Tables Beach, Florida.
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

A Stream of Thoughts

Endlessly flowing as the wind blows. Taken in Tables Beach, Florida.

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Crashing Waves
There’s just something so relaxing about hearing and watching the waves crash on the shore. Tables Beach, Florida
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Crashing Waves

There’s just something so relaxing about hearing and watching the waves crash on the shore. Tables Beach, Florida

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Post Sunset Scenes

I like heading out to the beach and arriving just in time for sunset; the reason being you get the most varied looking photos. From the normal daytime sky, the sunset, the post sunset colorful skies, and then the stars after. All these within a span of less than two hours. Taken in Tables Beach, Florida.

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Rays of Color
The Eastern sky after sunset taken Tables Beach, Patrick AFB, FL
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Rays of Color

The Eastern sky after sunset taken Tables Beach, Patrick AFB, FL

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Scenes from the edge of the boardwalk.
Taken at Venice Beach Pier in Venice, Florida.
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Scenes from the edge of the boardwalk.

Taken at Venice Beach Pier in Venice, Florida.

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Cloud Cover
A night of star gazing cut short by the clouds rolling in. You can still faintly see the Milky Way vertically oriented on the left side of the image. The bright light is the Moon of course.
Composed of 69 photos - each at 15 seconds, f/2.8, and ISO 1600. 
Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil

Cloud Cover

A night of star gazing cut short by the clouds rolling in. You can still faintly see the Milky Way vertically oriented on the left side of the image. The bright light is the Moon of course.

Composed of 69 photos - each at 15 seconds, f/2.8, and ISO 1600. 

Photographed by: Paolo Nacpil